LydBrock

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Lydia Brockless- Leeds College of Art BA (Hons) Fine Art Class of 2014

Sculpture and drawing.. look at my website:

www.lydiabrockless.co.uk

twitter.com/LydBrockl:

    duckbeans:

    to feel yourself as a soft mass held up by a hard structure. dig in. a sort of glue that tries to bounce the impacts away. just tubes.

    — 1 day ago with 3 notes
    A post which is painful to make…

    So you might have seen me posting about getting through the first round of FloatArt London 2014.

    Good news is I got through to the final and was invited to take part in the exhibition.

    Bad news is I’m away when it’s on, which means I can’t do it.

    Biggest. Bummer. Of. My. Life.

    — 1 day ago
    #pick myself up and start again  #apply to anything and everything all the time  #such is my life  #this was big  #really really big  #a missed opportunity  #which basically broke my heart 
    Check it outtttt! A heat gun of my very own #DeWalt #powertools #artisttools

    Check it outtttt! A heat gun of my very own #DeWalt #powertools #artisttools

    — 1 day ago with 1 note
    #powertools  #dewalt  #artisttools 
    Since I finished with university my life has changed in so many ways. I’ve moved away from Leeds, I live with my boyfriend, I finally have a day job and I’ve been working so hard to keep my practice going as well as applying for loads of art opportunities. My workspace has been dramatically downsized, now consisting of a small IKEA desk in our spare room. Obviously this isn’t ideal, but it’s allowed me to do some nitpicking about my practice and where I want it to go.

For a start, I was overwhelmingly compelled to draw. The idea for a series of small scale abstract drawn works started out with a tiny notebook and a felt tip pen, and continued simply as an indulgence in my sudden urge to draw and satisfy an interest in a combination of different kinds of surfaces like simple note paper, envelopes, graph paper, textured hand made paper, and board. That’s all I’ve been posting lately and I hope I’ll get an opportunity to exhibit them all together one day.

I’ve done other stuff like material tests with beeswax, stones and soap, and while they’ve been interesting, the conclusion for me is that I’ve not interested enough in exploring new materials yet. I’ve basically been on a high from the overwhelming success of the heat gun technique on my synthetic textiles ever since I discovered it, and I’ve been thinking about where to take it next.

Something that had stuck with me all through third year was something said by a recent graduate from my course when he came to give us a talk about life after college. Of course all the graduates stressed the importance of making work, whether it’s ‘good’ or ‘bad’ is not the point- bad work is better than no work, and it’s this that helps us towards the good work. But the real wisdom he gave that day was to do with WHAT to make- always have a motif. It’s quite simple really- whenever you want to work but don’t know what to do, have something you always go back to. This guy would always draw a cake, and sometimes the cake made it into paintings or sculptures, sometimes it didn’t. But it was having something to start on. 

For me, the knitted or crocheted tube form was responsible for so many breakthroughs, both conceptual (see Lippard’s Eccentric Abstraction, and Briony Fer’s Objects Beyond Objecthood) and sculptural. I used to joke that “when in doubt, knit a tube”, but that’s become less and less of a joke, and more of a mantra. What I’m trying to say is that experimentation is all well and good. It helps to expand thinking patterns, take my mind away from frustrations with what I actually want to do, but it’s not everything. Creative journeys grow like trees, and much of the time the success comes from revisiting the junctions where you took the branch on the right, and seeing where the branch on the left takes you. That sounds horrible but it’s sort of the only way I can think to put it..

Anyway, when in doubt, knit/crochet a tube. Or whatever your equivalent is.

    Since I finished with university my life has changed in so many ways. I’ve moved away from Leeds, I live with my boyfriend, I finally have a day job and I’ve been working so hard to keep my practice going as well as applying for loads of art opportunities. My workspace has been dramatically downsized, now consisting of a small IKEA desk in our spare room. Obviously this isn’t ideal, but it’s allowed me to do some nitpicking about my practice and where I want it to go.

    For a start, I was overwhelmingly compelled to draw. The idea for a series of small scale abstract drawn works started out with a tiny notebook and a felt tip pen, and continued simply as an indulgence in my sudden urge to draw and satisfy an interest in a combination of different kinds of surfaces like simple note paper, envelopes, graph paper, textured hand made paper, and board. That’s all I’ve been posting lately and I hope I’ll get an opportunity to exhibit them all together one day.

    I’ve done other stuff like material tests with beeswax, stones and soap, and while they’ve been interesting, the conclusion for me is that I’ve not interested enough in exploring new materials yet. I’ve basically been on a high from the overwhelming success of the heat gun technique on my synthetic textiles ever since I discovered it, and I’ve been thinking about where to take it next.

    Something that had stuck with me all through third year was something said by a recent graduate from my course when he came to give us a talk about life after college. Of course all the graduates stressed the importance of making work, whether it’s ‘good’ or ‘bad’ is not the point- bad work is better than no work, and it’s this that helps us towards the good work. But the real wisdom he gave that day was to do with WHAT to make- always have a motif. It’s quite simple really- whenever you want to work but don’t know what to do, have something you always go back to. This guy would always draw a cake, and sometimes the cake made it into paintings or sculptures, sometimes it didn’t. But it was having something to start on.

    For me, the knitted or crocheted tube form was responsible for so many breakthroughs, both conceptual (see Lippard’s Eccentric Abstraction, and Briony Fer’s Objects Beyond Objecthood) and sculptural. I used to joke that “when in doubt, knit a tube”, but that’s become less and less of a joke, and more of a mantra. What I’m trying to say is that experimentation is all well and good. It helps to expand thinking patterns, take my mind away from frustrations with what I actually want to do, but it’s not everything. Creative journeys grow like trees, and much of the time the success comes from revisiting the junctions where you took the branch on the right, and seeing where the branch on the left takes you. That sounds horrible but it’s sort of the only way I can think to put it..

    Anyway, when in doubt, knit/crochet a tube. Or whatever your equivalent is.

    — 2 weeks ago
    #art  #process  #art practice  #post art school  #studio 

    When all else fails, #knit a tube

    — 2 weeks ago
    #knit 
    Float Art London first round selections →

    Scroll down to see my work amongst the others through first round of the Float Art 2014 competition

    — 3 weeks ago with 1 note
    Channelling Yayoi Kusama #infinitynets

    Channelling Yayoi Kusama #infinitynets

    — 4 weeks ago with 1 note
    #infinitynets 

    Soap sculpture tests. They’re completely dry now, but still shrinking and wrinkling, I’ll take more pictures when they look completely shrivelled.

    Not sure whether I’ll pursue this soap thing, it’s a good material but I still haven’t finished with textiles and heat manipulation, got some more ideas for when I have space and a heat gun

    — 4 weeks ago with 3 notes
    #art  #sculpture  #soap  #lydbrock  #studio 

    I’ve been wondering how soap could work as a sculptural medium.

    I was thinking mainly about how it stands as a material with its connotations of cleansing, strong associations with the body, transformations between dirty/corrupt/tarnished and clean/new/pure.

    Also about its physicality- it comes as a solid, is used with the addition of water. Can be melted, moulded, and re-hardened. But if left to dry out, it can shrivel and crack and take on a different form.

    As a material with such mutability and bodily associations, it seemed logical to start experimenting with it.

    Today i melted some plain bar soap down, and sort of crammed/spread it into some acrylic hemispheres and cardboard tubes. They’re in the freezer now.

    — 1 month ago with 4 notes
    #art  #sculpture  #soap  #studio 
    101 alternative uses for degree show work, no.1 makes a great clothes horse

    101 alternative uses for degree show work, no.1 makes a great clothes horse

    — 1 month ago with 3 notes
    Today I received my application pack for A Letter in Mind, an open exhibition with an anonymous auction in aid of the National Brain Appeal.
I think it’s an excellent idea, if you’re in the UK you should definitely get yourself a pack, it’s free and for charity! Click the picture or the link above

    Today I received my application pack for A Letter in Mind, an open exhibition with an anonymous auction in aid of the National Brain Appeal.

    I think it’s an excellent idea, if you’re in the UK you should definitely get yourself a pack, it’s free and for charity! Click the picture or the link above

    — 1 month ago
    #a letter in mind  #national brain appeal  #neurology  #neurosurgery  #charity